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PBGV Basic Information

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PBGV BASIC INFORMATION

What is a PBGV really like?
Is he trainable?
What can he be trained to do?
Does he bark much?
Is he destructive?
How is he with children?
Can my PBGV run loose around the yard and on walks?
Will I need a fenced yard?
Can a PBGV live in an apartment?
I would like to have more than one. Do several get along together? Will he get along with my current family pet?
Is it possible to get an older, already trained dog?
Will I be able to see a PBGV at a dog show?
Will I need to spay or neuter my dog?


Q: What is a PBGV really like?
A: The PBGV is an active, curious, busy, happy, alert, independent and highly intelligent hound. He's affectionate and willing to please. He's a dog that needs 'people attention' and if his owner neglects him, will demand it. The PBGV is basically a pack animal and much of his behavior reflects this heritage as a hunting hound.

Q: Is he trainable? top
A: You may have heard that PBGV's are hard to train. This is not true! The PBGV is intelligent and can be trained for many purposes. He also has a great desire to please. The problem for the owner is the dog is so smart that he often has his own agenda, which may not be the same as the owners!

Q:What can he be trained to do? top
A: The first training for any dog should be basic obedience to learn good manners. Today, PBGVs are not only show dogs, but also compete successfully in obedience, rally, tracking, scent work and agility trials. Every dog can participate in the AKC Star Puppy and Canine Good Citizen (CGC) programs. A few are used in search and rescue and as therapy dogs. Kennel clubs, local dog training clubs and some animal supply stores can provide you with information about obedience, rally and agility classes, and about participating in therapy work and visitation programs.

Q: Does he bark much? top
A: Our standard states that "he has a good voice which is freely used." Most PBGV's bark at something rather than just barking for no reason.

Q: Is he destructive? top
A: A bored or lonely PBGV will make his own 'entertainment'. Giving your dog a variety of toys and dog chews, a safe environment and eliminating the opportunity to be destructive will control this potential problem. The use of a crate not only provides this safety, but it also becomes his own special place.

Q: How is he with children? top
A: PBGV's generally love all people - size doesn't matter. Most dogs, including the PBGV, seem to have a natural affinity with children. As with any dog, you should never leave a young child and your pet together unattended. Particularly when a child has cookies, goodies, or is playing with their toys at the same level as the dog. 

Q: Can my PBGV run loose around the yard and on walks? top
A: Sorry! This is one breed that should not be allowed to be off lead. The hunting instinct is too strong. All that is needed is one small scent and your hunter will be off on the chase.

Q: Will I need a fenced yard? top
A: If you want to allow your dog to play freely in your yard, you will need a secure fence. Some PBGV's are good escape artists so the fence should ideally be 4 to 6 ft. high. This is one place that digging may be a problem. Watch for small holes and/or signs of interest along the fence line. He would as soon go under as he would to go over. Some owners may wish to use a variety of 'invisible fencing'. A PBGV who sees a rabbit or squirrel on the other side of the yard will often ignore the electrical shock to chase this prey. An invisible fence also will not prevent other intruders from coming on your property. A permanent fence is the safest approach!

Q: Can a PBGV live in an apartment? top
A: Yes, if the owner is consistent with exercising the dog. A PBGV needs lots of exercise and just taking the dog out to relieve itself is not sufficient. Several half mile or longer walks each day should provide the necessary exercise.

Q: I would like to have more than one. Do several get along together? Will he get along with my current family pet? top
A: One PBGV is a marvelous experience. Two are a greater joy. They provide company and entertainment for each other. Any new animal being brought into your home and properly introduced will usually make friends with the older dog. PBGV's ordinarily get along well with the rest of the family pets and with other dogs that come into their home.

Q: Is it possible to get an older, already trained dog? top
A: Member Breeders sometimes have older dogs for sale, usually Champions no longer being shown. The Rescue Committee will sometimes have a PBGV rescued from a shelter. These dogs are available for placement.

Q: Will I be able to see a PBGV at a dog show? top
A: You may not find them at every show. Take a chance and attend shows in your area. You may be lucky! Check the AKC event calendar for local listings. 

Q: Will I need to spay or neuter my dog? top
A: Many breeders will not sell you a pet unless you agree to spay or neuter the animal. Being a responsible owner is assuring you are not producing unwanted dogs that frequently end up in shelters. If you think you want to "show" your dog in conformation be sure to discuss this ahead of time with the breeder. Neutered or spayed animals can participate in all of the areas of competition except conformation. Remember: A neutered or spayed dog usually has fewer health problems.

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DISCLAIMER
The Petit Basset Griffon Club of America is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. All information in this site is provided “as is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness or of the results obtained from the use of this information.

 
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Category: Finding A PBGV
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